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Kelp - A Centuries-Old Superfood!

Seaweed? Kelp? Is that good for you? Well, lots of people sure think it is!

Kelp, a type of seaweed, is full of nutrients that are considered to be beneficial to your health. It grows in underwater forests in shallow, nutrient-rich saltwater, near coastal fronts around the world. This type of sea algae is a natural source of essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Naturally Botanicals - Kelp 2

People have been harvesting and gathering seaweed for centuries. Some people are just becoming aware of its reported incredible value for our health while others made it a part of their typical diet. It’s used in many Asian cuisines so you may have had the opportunity to enjoy it in dishes or as a side dish. Kelp can be eaten raw, cooked, or powdered.

Large brown algae seaweeds make up the order Laminariales and is thought to have appeared in the Miocene Epoch about 5 to 23 million years ago. There are approximately 30 varieties included under the general classification of kelp. In most varieties, the body is made of flat, leaf-like structures known as blades. Blades come out of long “stem” structures called stipes. Finally, the “holdfast” serves as the roots of kelp, anchoring it to the ocean floor.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) say that seaweed such as kelp is one of the best natural food sources of iodine, an essential component in thyroid hormone production. (1)

Kelp is now being considered a superfood as it is rich in minerals and vitamins. Sea kelp is a natural source of vitamins A, B1, B2, C, D, and E, as well as minerals including zinc, iodine, magnesium, iron, potassium, copper, and calcium.

Kelp is naturally high in antioxidants, including carotenoids, flavonoids, and alkaloids, which help to fight against disease-causing free radicals. In terms of nutrition, kelp contains dietary fiber, carbohydrates, protein, and amino acids. It is a rich source of vitamin B1, riboflavin, vitamin B3, folate, pantothenic acid, vitamin C, and vitamin K. The mineral wealth in it also includes sodium, boron, and manganese. Antioxidant vitamins like vitamin C, and minerals like manganese and zinc, help to combat oxidative stress and may offer benefits to cardiovascular health.

Naturally Botanicals - Kelp 1Kelp offers different nutrients than what you'd find in land vegetables because it absorbs many of the minerals from seawater and sea soil in which it grows. Because kelp’s nutrients come in a natural form, they are easily absorbed and used by the body. Kelp is also a great salt substitute. Kelp is low in fat and calories.

The benefits of these vitamins and nutrients are substantial. B vitamins, in particular, are essential for cellular metabolism and providing your body with energy. According to UCSF Medical Center, kelp has more calcium than many vegetables, including kale and collard greens. Calcium is important to maintain strong bones and optimal muscle function. (2)

Kelp is the largest source of iodine, which makes it the number one herb for supplementing iodine. Iodine is critical in supporting the hormones that are made in the thyroid gland. It is also a key component in regulating the thyroid to produce healthy hair, skin, and nails. It is essential for bone health, brain metabolism, and our energy levels. 

Kelp also produces a compound called sodium alginate. This is used as a thickener in many foods including ice cream and salad dressing.

Kelp may be used as a treatment for the following health benefits:
• Boosting immune health
• Promoting hydration
• Reducing swelling and water retention 
• Strengthening the bones
• Treating thyroid disorders
• Improving metabolism
• Treating poor digestion and circulation
• Inflammation
• Arthritis
• Maintaining pH Balance
• Reducing nodules
• Promoting urination

 
If you'd like to check out some of our products that contain Kelp, please visit these links: 
Green Complex by Professional Botanicals
Multi Plus by Dynamic Nutritional Associates (DNA Labs)
Thyroid 3 by Professional Botanicals
Immu Cell by Professional Botanicals

Immu Guard by Professional Botanicals

Power Greens Premium Berry by NuMedica

 

 


Note: The content of this article, and additional content on this website, are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking help because of something you read here on this website.





Valerian Root

Valerian is an herb that’s native to Europe and parts of Asia but also grows in North America. Valerian root, which has been used as a medicinal herb for centuries, is derived from valerian (Valeriana officinalis), a perennial flowering plant from the Valerianaceae family. Naturally Botanicals-Valerian Root - Valeriana officinalis 2

The origins of the name of Valerian root is one of our favorites. It’s considered to be derived from the personal name “Valeria” and the Latin verb “valere” (to be strong, healthy). As you probably know, we’re fans of strong and healthy! 

Since ancient times Valerian has been used for medicinal purposes as an herb. It has been used as a medicinal herb since at least the time of ancient Greece and Rome. Hippocrates described its properties, and Galen later prescribed it as a remedy for insomnia.

The Chinese, Romans, Greeks, and Indians used it as a mild sedative. The Persians and Chinese have also reported having made a natural medicine to treat wounds – using the plant as an antiseptic. Other cultures used it as a treatment for conditions such as epilepsy, sleep disorder, anxiety, headaches, asthma, migraine, joint pain, menopause, and hot flashes.

The most famous usage of valerian was during the First and Second World Wars. It was used not only for soldiers but also for the people affected by the war. People used Valerian specifically for the treatment of shell shock and nervous stress. 

Most of the valerian used in medicine is grown on farms and cultivated for this purpose. The valerian plant is a perennial that can reach a height of 4 feet and features sweetly scented pink, white or purple flowers.

The root is where the dense concentration of active ingredients and medicinal components are located, so the small rootlets or the large rhizome itself is harvested. Although it has been in use for thousands of years, valerian root is now known to contain high levels of alkaloids, flavanones, and sesquiterpenes, along with other active ingredients and volatile compounds.

One of the flavonoids, called linarin, has sedative effects. Valerian root extract causes sedation because it increases the level of GABA in the brain. GABA or Gamma-aminobutyric acid is essentially a neurotransmitter in the nervous system. Valerian also contains a compound called valerenic acid which inhibits the enzymes which destroy GABA. 

There are many active phytochemicals found within this plant. It also has a high
nutrient content in the roots as well as the stems and leaves of Valerian. Some of the nutrients found in Valerian root include Calcium, Choline, Essential fatty acids, Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Phosphorus, Potassium, Selenium, Zinc, and Vitamins B1, B2, B3, and CValerian is famous for its anxiolytic, sedative, anticonvulsant, antibacterial, anti-diuretic, anti-thrombotic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, and anti-inflammatory properties.

Valerian root has been known to have a positive effect on heart health. It can strengthen blood vessels, improve its elasticity, and stabilize blood pressure. Its anti-thrombotic effect helps to prevent blood clots as well.

Naturally Botanicals-Valerian Root - Valeriana officinalis 1Valerian root has also been shown to relieve pain. This, combined with the sedative effect, makes it effective in relieving headaches (especially stress headaches,) migraines, arthritis and muscle pain.

In manufacturing, the extracts and oil made from valerian are used as flavoring in foods and beverages.

 

 

 

Valerian Root may be used as a treatment for the following health benefits:

•  Treating Insomnia
•  Increasing quality and duration of sleep
•  Reducing anxiety
•  Treating panic attacks
•  Relieving headaches
        •  Maintaining heart health
•  Helping to provide a soothing effect on the central nervous system
•  Help lower blood pressure
        •  Improving stress

If you'd like to check out some of our products that contain Valerian Root please visit these links:

Cal/Mg Plus Boron by Professional Botanicals
Cardio + CoQ by Professional Botanicals
Pressu Norm by Professional Botanicals
Relaxall by Professional Botanicals
Sleep Eaze by Professional Botanicals
Total Comfort by Professional Botanicals
Tense-X by Professional Botanicals
Tranquinell by Dynamic Nutritional Associates (DNA Labs)

 

 

 


Note: The content of this article, and additional content on this website, are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking help because of something you read here on this website.




Hawthorn Berry

Ever heard of the hawthorn berry? Or maybe the “heart herb?” It’s not as well-known as other berries like blue, black and straw, however, hawthorn has been used as a digestive aid in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries, and Native American tribes not only enjoyed eating them but they used hawthorn to treat heart troubles and gastrointestinal complaints. 

So how did the hawthorn become “the heart herb?” It’s because of its various cardio-protective abilities. Various cultures have used Hawthorn berry for centuries as a natural remedy for all kinds of serious heart concerns. These include angina, high blood pressure, hardening of the arteries, irregular heartbeat, and even congestive heart failure.

Hawthorn fruit comes in the form of little red berries. Dried haws or berries, green stems, flowers, and leaves are the parts of the plants that are used. Occasionally the bark has been used as herbal medicine.

Why are hawthorn berries considered to be so medicinal? One reason may be their numerous flavonoids. Flavonoids are potent antioxidants known to effectively decrease inflammation while boosting immune function. The leaves, flowers, and berries of hawthorn contain an abundance of phytonutrients (antioxidants). The phytonutrients of the hawthorn plant appear to be the key to the way it helps your heart. It's thought to be particularly valuable in the early stages of heart disease, from improving blood flow to the blood vessels around your heart and brain, to increasing tolerance to the heart muscle due to a lack of oxygen.

The Latin name Crataegus, for the hawthorn tree or shrub is from the Greek kratos "strength" and akis "sharp", referring to the thorns of some species. The name haw, originally an Old English term for hedge, applies to the fruit. Crataegus is a large genus of plants that belong to the rose family (Rosaceae). In addition to being known as hawthorn, it is called mayblossom, hedgethorn, maybush, mayflower, and whitethorn.

“Hawthorn has been shown to improve heart function, shortness of breath, palpitations, and exercise tolerance in people with heart failure. Hawthorn is a fruit extract that has been used as a digestive aid in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. Scientists think that hawthorn extract causes dilation of the smooth muscle that lines coronary arteries, thereby increasing blood flow to the heart. Hawthorn is also thought to increase heart muscle contraction, heart rate, nerve transmission, and heart muscle irritability.” (1)

"The journal, American Family Physician suggests that hawthorn can enhance a person’s ability to exercise following heart failure. It can also improve symptoms of fatigue and shortness of breath. (2)

Hawthorn berry is considered to have antioxidant, astringent, antispasmodic, cardiotonic, carminative, diuretic, sedative, stimulant, and vasodilator properties.

Naturally Botanicals - Hawthorn Berry - Crateagus oxycanthus 2
The hawthorn herb is loaded with health beneficial compounds. These compounds have been shown to really boost heart health. Here are just some of the many chemical compounds and nutrients found in Hawthorn: Flavonoids, Quercetin, Rutin, Choline, Acetylcholine, Chlorogenic acid, Caffeic acid, Vitamins B1, B2 and C, Iron, Calcium and Phosphorus.



Hawthorn Berry may be used as a treatment for the following health benefits:

  • Ailments related to the heart and blood vessels
  • Controlling blood pressure
  • Helping to relieve anxiety
  • Interacting with gut flora to improve digestion. 
  • Assisting the digestive process
  • Helping with constipation, bloating and cramping.
  • Eliminating intestinal infections
  • Helping to reduce itching on healing wounds or from other skin conditions such as eczema or psoriasis.
  • Lowering Cholesterol levels
  • Increasing energy or alertness
  • Antioxidative benefits
  • Improving memory

If you'd like to check out some of our products that contain Hawthorn Berry, please visit these links: 
Pressu Norm by Professional Botanicals
Cardio+CoQ by Professional Botanicals
Sugar Metabolizer by Professional Botanicals

Interesting fact:
There’s an old saying in Scotland: "Ne'er cast a cloot til Mey's oot."
(Meaning, don't start removing layers of clothing before the summer has fully arrived and the Mayflowers (hawthorn blossoms) are in full bloom.)


Note: The content of this article, and additional content on this website, are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking help because of something you read here on this website.




Cloves

Do you love gingerbread or pumpkin pie? Spiced apple cider?  Or chai tea? An ingredient these all share is clove. Cloves have a unique flavor which can be best described as is fruity, crisp and rather bitter. The distinctive flavor is mainly because of the eugenol content found in the essential oil.Naturally Botanicals - Cloves - Syzygium aromaticum 1

What exactly is a clove? It's an unopened bud of the pink flowers of the evergreen clove tree. Their name comes from the Latin word “clavus,” which means “nail.” Why nail? A dried clove features a head with tapered stem, resembling a nail. Cloves are pink when fresh, however, they are almost always used once they have dried and turned brown.

The Latin name for cloves is Syzygium aromaticum. They are in the Myrtaceae, or myrtle family.

Myrtle, bay rum tree, clove, guava, allspice, and eucalyptus are some notable members of this group. All species are woody, contain essential oils, and have flower parts in multiples of four or five.

Cloves are native to the Maluku islands in Indonesia. Both cloves and clove oil have been used in Asian cooking for over 2,000 years. Arab traders introduced cloves to Europe in the fourth century, and their pungent flavor was used in the Middle Ages to mask the sour or bitter taste of poorly preserved foods. Today, most cloves are grown in Zanzibar, in Eastern Africa.

The Chinese have used clove for more than 2,000 years as a fragrance and spice. Cloves were brought to the Han dynasty of China from Indonesia as early as 200 BC. Back then, people would hold cloves in their mouths to improve breath odor during audiences with their emperor. The oldest recorded medical use of cloves, as early as 240 BC, comes from China, where it was used as a remedy for many different ailments, including diarrhea and hernia. It has been used traditionally to prevent nausea, for bad digestion, enhance blood circulation, to relieve hiccups and enhance liver function. And has long been considered to be useful for infections of both bacterial and viral nature.

Clove oil is widely used in aromatherapy. Clove oil is also be used for the artificial production of vanillin, the substance that gives the flavor of vanilla. The ancient Persians supposedly used clove oil as a love potion. Essential oils are obtained from the leaves, stems and flower buds of the clove-tree by steam distillation. The clove oil is a pale yellow liquid with a strong and spicy aroma.

With its long history, cloves have been considered anti-fungal, antibacterial, antiseptic and analgesic. They also contain anti-mutagenic and anti-microbial properties. Medicinally, the most studied compound found in cloves is eugenol. Eugenol is the primary component of clove's volatile oils. It functions as an anti-inflammatory substance. Clove also contains a variety of flavonoids, including kaempferol (also present in high levels in cruciferous vegetables), and rhamnetin (a metabolite, an antioxidant, and an anti-inflammatory agent). Both contribute to clove's anti-inflammatory (and antioxidant) properties.

Naturally Botanicals - Cloves - Syzygium aromaticum 2Clove's unsurpassed level of antioxidants includes a number of different antioxidant compounds. These include two very well-researched antioxidants, anthocyanins, and quercetin. Although most spices are excellent sources of antioxidants, cloves rank as the richest source of them all. Chemical analysis shows that cloves have at least 36 different ingredients, the most important being an essential oil called eugenol. Cloves also contain a variety of flavonoids which contribute to clove's abundant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

Cloves contain fiber, vitamins, and minerals. They are an excellent source of manganese, as well as dietary fiber, vitamin K, vitamin C, calcium and magnesium. According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, the nutrients found in cloves include carbohydrates, protein, energy, and dietary fiber. Minerals in cloves include potassium, calcium, sodium, and magnesium. The vitamins found in them include vitamin E, vitamin A, folate, and niacin. They also contain phosphorus, iron, zinc, thiamin, and riboflavin.

Cloves may be used as a treatment for the following health benefits:

  • Better Digestion
  • Regulating Blood Sugar
  • Liver Protection
  • Diabetes Control
  • Bone Preservation
  • Promoting Youthful Skin
  • Immunity Booster
  • Supporting Headache Relief
  • Oral Health

 

If you'd like to check out some of our products that contain Cloves, please visit these links:

Liver Detox by Professional Botanicals

Liver Detox  + Silymarin by Professional Botanicals

 

An interesting story - Clove oil was considered to be one of the main essential oils that protected people from getting the bubonic plague in Europe. A group of robbers was caught by the king and he asked them why they weren’t ill or dead from the plague exposure. They said it was because they covered themselves with this protective blend of oils (“thieves oil”), which included clove.

 

 

 

 


Note: The content of this article, and additional content on this website, are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking help because of something you read here on this website.




Garlic

Whether you consider it to be a stinking rose or the nectar of the gods, garlic has been around forever. It was traditionally used for health purposes by people in many parts of the world, including the Egyptians, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans, Chinese, Japanese, and Native Americans.

Naturally Botanicals-Allium sativum-Garlic

Many cultures considered garlic a cure-all. In ancient and medieval times, it was revered for its medicinal properties and was carried as a charm against vampires and other evils. In traditional, homeopathic medicine, garlic is valued for its antioxidant, antibiotic, antimicrobial, antiseptic, and antiparasitic properties.

Garlic is used in many cuisines around the world. It has been used for centuries by many ethnicities. It was rare for garlic to be used in traditional English cuisine (though it is said to have been grown in England before 1548) and has been a much more common ingredient in Mediterranean Europe.

When the English came to America, they brought their anti-garlic attitude with them. It took almost 3 centuries for this attitude to change, though garlic was used as a folk medicine. By about 1940, America had embraced garlic, recognizing its value as not only a minor seasoning, but as a major ingredient in recipes.

Garlic is a plant in the Allium (onion) family. Its Latin name is Allium sativum. Garlic is a perennial plant of the amaryllis family (Amaryllidaceae), a class of bulb-shaped plants, which include chives, leeks, onions, and scallions. Lilies are also part of this family. Garlic grows underneath the soil in the form of a bulb. This bulb has long green shoots that come out from the top while its roots extend downward. It’s believed that the word garlic comes from Old English garleac, meaning "spear leek."

What is usually referred to as a “head of garlic” is, in botanical terms, a bulb, i. e., a sub­terranean reserve structure derived from a cluster of leaves. The single leaves are known as “cloves of garlic.” (1)

The use of garlic in China dates back thousands of years. It was consumed by ancient Greek and Roman soldiers, sailors, and rural classes (Virgil, Eclogues ii. 11), and, according to Pliny the Elder (Natural History xix. 32), by the African peasantry. 

"The magic – and magical potency – of garlic was recognized, it seems, from the moment of its emergence into European culture. In his encyclopedic Natural History (XIX. 101), Pliny the Elder (died 79 CE) noted that “whenever they take an oath, the Egyptians swear by garlic and onions as though they were gods.” Why garlic and onions were granted this honor rather than, say, saffron, is not disclosed. In any event, the ancient Egyptians seem to have held garlic in high repute, for it made its way into Tutankhamen’s tomb." (2)

Garlic contains countless vital nutrients — flavonoids, oligosaccharides, amino acids, allicin and high levels of sulfur, to name a few.  Garlic is particularly high in certain sulfur compounds that are believed to be responsible for its scent and taste, as well as for positive effects on human health.  

Garlic is incredibly nutritious. It contains Manganese, Vitamin B6, Vitamin C, Selenium, and fiber, as well as calcium, copper, potassium, phosphorus, iron, and vitamin B1.

These are just some of the top nutrients found in garlic. Garlic also contains alliin and allicin, When you bite into fresh garlic -- or cut it or crush it -- it develops a component called allicin from the precursor component alliin. Allicin has antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. Allicin also makes garlic smell. 

Naturally Botanicals-Allium sativum-Garlic 2In 2016, world production of garlic was 26.6 million tons, with China accounting for 80% of the total. India was the second largest producer. The United States – ranked 10th in global production of garlic – grows less than 1% of China's production. Much of the garlic production in the United States is centered in Gilroy, CA, the self-proclaimed "Garlic Capital of the World."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garlic may be used as a treatment for the following health benefits:

 

  • Reducing Colds and Infections
  • Controlling Blood Pressure
  • Lowering Cholesterol Levels
  • Detoxifying Heavy Metals
  • Improving Bone Health
  • Improving Muscle Function
  • Assisting your Athletic Performance 
  • Regulating Blood Sugar Levels
  • Encouraging Circulation
  • Antioxidative Benefits

 

Is garlic ice cream a thing? Yes, it is! Many people love it. 

https://www.thespruceeats.com/gilroy-garlic-ice-cream-recipe-101385

 

If you'd like to check out some of our products that contain Garlic, please visit these links:

Pressu Norm by Professional Botanicals

Metal Detox by Professional Botanicals

Attack by Professional Botanicals

Cranberry Complex by Professional Botanicals

Candida-X2 by Professional Botanicals

 


Note: The content of this article, and additional content on this website, are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking help because of something you read here on this website.




Ginger Root

We’ll just say it up front and get it over with. We love ginger!!! Ginger ale, ginger beer, ginger candy,Naturally Botanicals-Ginger-Zingiber officinale gingersnaps, gari (sushi ginger), and hot or cold ginger tea.

Ginger is one of the most widely consumed aromatic spices on the planet. In addition to ginger tasting great, it has some excellent medicinal properties. It was originally a plant that thrived in the southern parts of Asia, where it was used as both a medicine and a spice since ancient times. The plant is primarily grown for its rhizome or root; other parts of the plant may also be consumed as a type of vegetable, or used as a seasoning.

Ginger is a very common ingredient in many types of cuisine. It is used to add a little spiciness to soups and stews, or other foods. It can be eaten raw, cooked, dried, pickled or candied. 

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is a member of the Zingiberaceae family. (Say that 3 times fast!) That’s a family of flowering plants made up of about 1600 known species of aromatic perennial herbs with creeping horizontal or tuberous rhizomes (mass of roots) found throughout tropical Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Ginger is valued for its flavor and the age-old medicinal effects of its roots. Turmeric, cardamom, and galangal are also members of the Zingiberaceae family.

Ancient Sanskrit, Chinese, Greek, Roman, and Arabic texts discussed the use of ginger for health-related purposes. In Asian medicine, dried ginger root has been used for thousands of years to treat stomachache, diarrhea, and nausea and other gastrointestinal problems, such as bloating, loose stools, flatulence, nausea, and vomiting, and for treatment of inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis. 

In herbal medicine, ginger is regarded as an excellent carminative (a substance which promotes the elimination of intestinal gas) and intestinal spasmolytic (a substance which relaxes and soothes the intestinal tract). Ginger has also been known to be effective in the treatment of menstrual cramps and migraine headache.

Ginger is considered to be a potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, anti-bacterial and anti-nausea agent.

Naturally Botanicals-Ginger-Zingiber officinale 2Ginger grows in sub-tropical, volcanic soils in the southern hemispheres. Native to southeastern Asia, ginger has been renowned for centuries in many areas throughout the world. It has long been prized for its aromatic, culinary and medicinal properties. After the ancient Romans imported ginger from China almost two thousand years ago, its popularity in Europe remained centered in the Mediterranean region until the Middle Ages when its use spread throughout other countries. Although it was a very expensive spice, owing to the fact that it had to be imported from Asia, it was still in great demand. In an attempt to make it more available, Spanish explorers introduced ginger to the West Indies, Mexico, and South America. In the 16th century, these areas began exporting the precious herb back to Europe. Today, the top commercial producers of ginger include Jamaica, India, Fiji, Indonesia, and Australia.

The volatile oils in dried rhizome of ginger, including gingerols (the major pungent compounds present in the rhizomes), shogaols (imparting the characteristic pungent taste to dried ginger) zingiberene (contributing to the herb’s aroma) and bisabolene (a natural chemical compound which is present in the essential oils) are considered to be responsible for the healing abilities of ginger.

Raw ginger is composed of 79% water, 18% carbohydrates, 2% protein, and 1% fat. It contains moderate amounts of Vitamin B6 and dietary minerals magnesium and manganese.

Ginger Root may be used as a treatment for following health benefits

  • Bloating
  • Flatulence
  • Nausea
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Stomachache
  • Menstrual Cramps
  • Migraines
  • Motion Sickness
  • Asthma
  • Sinusitis
  • Heartburn

These chewy ginger cookies sound fabulous. They feature fresh, powdered AND crystallized ginger for a triple kick.

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/chewy-ginger-cookies

 

If you'd like to check out some of our products that contain Ginger Root, please visit these links:

Inf-X by Professional Botanicals

Female Gland Balance by Professional Botanicals

Menopause by Professional Botanicals

Di-Aide Enzymes by Professional Botanicals

InVert by Professional Botanicals



Note: The content of this article, and additional content on this website, are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking help because of something you read here on this website.




Licorice Root

When you think about licorice do you think about candy? Most likely! But did you know that licoriceNaturally Botanicals-Glycyrrhiza glabra-Licorice Root 1 was used centuries ago in Greece, China, and Egypt for stomach inflammation and upper respiratory problems. Early Egyptians loved licorice root. They used it in tea as a cure for everything! Licorice was later imported to China where it became an important herb in Chinese medicinal tradition. Today, people still use licorice root to help with digestive problems, menopausal symptoms, coughs, and bacterial and viral infections. 

The word “licorice” refers to the root of a plant called Glycyrrhiza glabra, from which a sweet flavor can be extracted. That’s why it’s been used in candies and as a sweetener. Licorice is harvested from the plants’ roots and underground stems. Most licorice root grows in Greece, Turkey, and Asia.

Naturally Botanicals-Glycyrrhiza glabra-Licorice Root 2Licorice, interestingly enough, is a member of the legume family. A legume is a plant in the family Fabaceae; these are mostly herbs but include also shrubs and trees. A legume is a simple, dry fruit contained within a shed or a pod. Legumes you know and love include peas, chickpeas, lentils, carob, soybeans, peanuts, black beans, and black-eyed peas. 

In its centuries-long use, licorice root has been known to provide support for heartburn, leaky gut, adrenal fatigue, PMS and pain relief. The active ingredients in licorice include glycyrrhizin and flavonoids. Glycyrrhizin is an anti-inflammatory and antiviral substance, while the flavonoids are potent antioxidants, which help protect liver cells.

The chemicals contained in licorice are thought to decrease swelling, thin mucus secretions, decrease cough, and increase the chemicals in our body that heal ulcers. Licorice is considered to have immune-boosting properties. It’s also a demulcent (soothing) herb. 

It has also been known to help the body more efficiently regulate cortisol. Licorice is considered to be an adaptogen herb. Adaptogens are natural substances that work with a person’s body and help them adapt; most notably, to stress.

Glabridin (Glab), an isoflavonoid of Glycyrrhiza glabra roots, has been associated with a wide range of biological properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenic, regulation of energy metabolism, estrogenic, neuroprotective, anti-osteoporotic, and skin-whitening. (1)

 Isoflavonoids belong to a group of compounds called flavonoids, or bioflavonoids, that occur naturally in plants where they serve various functions, for example as the pigments that give flowers and fruits their color. The main plant source of isoflavonoids is legumes, such as various kinds of peas and beans.

Licorice root may be used as a treatment for following health benefits:

  • Heartburn and acid reflux including nausea, indigestion and stomach pain. 
  • Leaky Gut 
  • Adrenal fatigue
  • Immune system support
  • Cough/sore throat
  • PMS/Menopause
  • Pain relief
  • Skin Problems 
  • Stress Relief
  • Arthritis
  • Tendinitis

Licorice is also used to flavor foods and beverages. That being said, Anise oil is often used instead of licorice root to flavor licorice candy because it has the characteristic smell and taste of "black licorice."

 


Note: The content of this article, and additional content on this website, are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking help because of something you read here on this website.




Turmeric

Turmeric. You might not know the name but you probably know the flavor if you like curry.Naturally Botanicals - Turmeric root and powder - Curcuma longa

What we call turmeric is actually the dried and ground rhizome (root) of a plant in the same family as ginger (zingiberaceae). It has been used extensively in natural and folk medicine for centuries. It’s also used for its color and flavor in international cuisine.

Turmeric root is where we get both turmeric powder and curcumin. It’s often called ‘The Golden Spice’ or ‘The Spice of Life’. Turmeric is cultivated in India (the largest producer, consumer and exporter of turmeric), followed by Bangladesh, China, Thailand, and other Southeast Asian countries. In English, turmeric was called Indian saffron. Sanskrit has over 55 names for turmeric herb.

Yellow turmeric (Curcuma longa) roots have a rough, pale brown skin. On the inside, they’re bright orange or yellow. The rhizomes can be used while they are fresh or they can be boiled, then dried in hot ovens in order to be ground into the deep-orange-yellow powder commonly used for color and flavor in many Asian cuisines as well as for dyeing. Turmeric powder has a warm, bitter, black pepper-like flavor.

Because it has been used in folk medicine for centuries, many people believe that turmeric may be the most powerful herb on the planet at fighting and potentially reversing disease. According to a Google study, 2016 Food Trends from Google Search Data: The Rise of Functional Foods,

"Experts have dubbed the health-enhancing role of specific foods as “functional foods” i.e., foods that promote better health in addition to providing nutrition.

A number of the top trending foods over the last two years are "healthy" ingredients like turmeric, apple cider vinegar, avocado oil, bitter melon, and kefir (high in trendy bacteria called probiotics). They are said to infer benefits like better skin, libido, and energy or cures for depression, insomnia, and pain (in fact, "benefits" is a term that's commonly searched for along with many of these foods). Now, the focus of people's diets is less about eliminating foods than about adding them.

While the concept of functional foods has been around for decades, interest in these specific foods is growing faster than before. Turmeric, a spice that's purported to cure everything from cancer to depression, is the breakout star, with searches growing 300% over the last five years.”

https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/consumer-insights/2016-food-trends-google/

Naturally Botanicals - Turmeric flower - Curcuma longa

Turmeric also contains the chemical curcumin. Curcumin and other chemicals in turmeric have been known to decrease swelling (inflammation). It can be used externally and internally.

Turmeric contains minerals like calcium, potassium, phosphorous, sodium, iron, vitamins B and C, and manganese. It's also an excellent source of fiber, potassium, and magnesium.

There are several chemical compounds found in turmeric, known as curcuminoids. The active substance in turmeric is curcumin. Turmeric is considered to be a natural anti-inflammatory agent, have powerful antioxidant effects, be able to help keep your liver healthy, help stop the oxidization of cholesterol in your body, provide joint/injury support, and provide support to your immune health.

 

 

 

Turmeric may be used as a treatment for following health benefits:

  • Sprains
  • Swelling
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Bronchitis
  • Hay fever
  • Depression 
  • High cholesterol 
  • Itching (pruritus)
  • Skin inflammation
  • Stomach disorders
  • Fatigue

Turmeric does come in supplement form. You can add one to your daily routine in addition to adding turmeric to your diet. Add turmeric to smoothies, juices, soups, salads, or oatmeal; season your roasted vegetables with it; or make a batch of turmeric tea, also known as golden milk.

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/golden-milk-turmeric-tea

 


Note: The content of this article, and additional content on this website, are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking help because of something you read here on this website.




Eleuthero

Have you ever visited the island of Eleuthera? If you like islands, it sounds like a pretty fabulous place. A place, that with its wide rolling pink sand beaches, large outcrops of ancient coral reefs, caves and other geological features, sounds like it would be restful, fun, and provide a stress-free vacation.

Well, we’re not trying to sell you a travel package. It’s just that Eleuthera sounds like Eleuthero (also known as Siberian ginseng). Eleuthero (the herb) has been gaining fans in the West since the 1950s when a Russian scientist found that it appeared to have great power as a stress reducer. 

Eleuthero-Siberian Ginseng-Eleutherococcus senticosus berriesEleuthero has been used for centuries in Eastern countries, including China and Russia. Prized for its ability to restore vigor, increase longevity, enhance overall health, and stimulate both a healthy appetite and a good memory, it is widely used in some countries to help the body adapt to stressful conditions and to enhance productivity. 

Eluethero is the common name of Eleutherococcus senticosus, which is a thorny flowering shrub that can be found at the foot of cliffs. The root and the rhizomes (underground stem) are used medicinally. It is native to Japan, China, Korea, and the Far East of Russia. 

Even though it’s known as Siberian Ginseng, it’s not related to Korean or American ginseng in any way. It contains components called eleutherosides that are thought to increase stamina and to stimulate the immune system. 

Eleuthero-Siberian Ginseng-Eleutherococcus senticosusEleuthero is considered to be an “adaptogen.” This is a non-medical term used to describe substances that can supposedly reduce the effects of mental and physical stress and can help the user in a general, non-specific way.

It affects the adrenal glands in a positive way. These glands are found directly above the kidneys and are very important to good health. The body uses them to regulate metabolic functions, aid the immune system, regulate energy levels, and produce stress-fighting hormones.

 

 

Eleuthero is thought to help provide the following health benefits:

  • Enhance mental concentration
  • Enhance memory and learning ability
  • Prevent inflammation
  • Reduce stress and fatigue
  • Enhance athletic performance
  • Increase male and female fertility
  • Help the body deal with physically and mentally stressful exposures, such as heat, cold, physical exhaustion, viruses, bacteria, chemicals, extreme working conditions, noise, and pollution.

Note: The content of this article, and additional content on this website, are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking help because of something you read here on this website.




What Secret Ingredient Do Pineapples Contain?

Did you know that pineapples just might contain have secret healing powers?

Naturally Botanicals - Bromelain - Pineapple - Ananas comosusThe pineapple, unlike Saw Palmetto which has leaves like a saw and fruit you really do not want to eat, has sharp leaves and thick skin that belie all the goodness inside. Sweet delicious flesh, a core that you can juice or put in your smoothies, and bromelain, a mixture of enzymes found naturally in the juice and stems. So yummy and it has medicinal properties! And we’ve got a winner!

Pineapple is the common name of Ananas comosus (Ananas sativus, Ananassa sativa, Bromelia ananas, Bromelia comosa). It's noted that, when European explorers encountered the tropical fruit in the Americas, they called them "pineapples" for their resemblance to pine cones.

Pineapple is the leading edible member of the family Bromeliaceae, grown in several tropical and subtropical countries including Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Kenya, India, and China. Large-scale pineapple cultivation in Hawaii began in the early 1900s. Cannery operations in Hawaii flourished through the early 21st Century. Now a very small percentage of the world’s production is grown in Hawaii.

Pineapples have long been used as a medicinal plant among the natives of South and Central America. It has a centuries-long history of being used to treat medical ailments, primarily throughout Central and South America. The first isolation of bromelain was recorded in 1891. Bromelain is present in all parts of the pineapple plant but the stem has the highest concentration. The bromelain is extracted from the peel, stem, leaves or waste of the pineapple plant after processing the fruit for juice or other purposes. 

Naturally Botanicals - Bromelain - Pineapple - Ananas comosus 2Used widely as a natural remedy to treat everything from indigestion to allergies, pineapple is filled with this enzyme. It also has its share of vitamin C, vitamin B1, potassium, manganese and phytonutrients. 

Bromelain is thought to stimulate the body’s natural ability to relive inflammation and chronic pain. It’s also said to stimulate digestion and improve heart health. Even though it’s extracted from pineapple, eating pineapple or drinking its juice doesn’t supply a large enough dose to be effective.

Bromelain has long been used as a potent anti-inflammatory and anti-swelling agent. It’s also considered to be an anti-histamine and a diuretic; and may help prevent blood clots, edema and swelling. It has been used to improve the appearance of skin after a burn, and to help burn fat during weight loss.

 

 

Bromelain may be used as a treatment for following health benefits:

  • Allergies
  • Angina
  • Asthma
  • Bronchitis
  • Chronic Pain
  • Digestive Issues
  • Muscle Soreness
  • Nasal Swelling
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Sinusitis 
  • Faster healing of skin wounds and burns
  • Ulcerative Colitis.

Pineapple on pizza is very controversial. There’s the “I love it on pizza camp” and the “Never, no way, are you kidding me camp." Here’s an interesting twist from our friends at Cooking Light Magazine; use the pineapple as the base of the pizza in this recipe!

Interesting fact: As a culinary ingredient, it can be used as a meat tenderizer. Along with papain (found in papaya), bromelain is one of the most popular proteases to use for meat tenderizing. Bromelain is sold in a powdered form, which is combined with a marinade, or directly sprinkled on uncooked meat.

 


Note: The content of this article, and additional content on this website, are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking help because of something you read here on this website.





Blessed Thistle

Have you noticed there’s a pattern here? Spiny exterior hides the secret medicinal properties inside. Good use of camouflage if you’re a spiny plant.

Naturally Botanicals-Cnicus benedictus-Blessed thistleBlessed Thistle is native to the Mediterranean and is a member of the Asteraceae (Aster) family, as are Jerusalem Artichoke and Dandelion. It was often grown in the gardens of monks, and the leaves, stems and blossoms were used to make bitter tonics and liqueurs. Other names for Blessed Thistle include holy thistle, St. Benedict's thistle, and spotted thistle.

There are many different kinds of thistles. You may think that they look similar but Blessed thistle can still be identified by its own unique features. It has the characteristic hairy stems and spiny-edged leaves but it also produces bright yellow flowers surrounded by specialized leaves meant to attract pollinators. The plant's leaves can be up to a foot long and the entire plant can reach up to 2 feet. (That’s one way to ensure that your pollinators find you!) Blessed thistle flowers in June, at which time the leaves and tops are collected, as that is when the plant is at its highest degree of medicinal power. 

Why is it called Blessed thistle? It was grown in monastery gardens throughout Europe, near holy sites and graves to ward off evil. “Blessed” or “holy” refers to the belief that the plant was a gift from a higher power. Its botanical name is Cnicus benedictus.

 

Naturally Botanicals-Cnicus benedictus-Blessed thistle 2Once upon a time, Blessed thistle was used extensively for medicinal purposes. During the medieval period in Europe it was considered a cure for just about every ailment. It is one of the oldest folk remedies for treating the absence of the menstrual cycle, and is often used in commercial herbal preparations formulated for women. The plant is also believed to stimulate bile production in the liver and is used to treat liver disorders of all types. Other modern medicinal uses of blessed thistle include regulating the menstrual cycle, improving appetite, lowering fevers, helping lessen bacterial infections, providing anti-inflammatory support, and treating indigestion. 

 

The plant is not considered edible, as it has an extremely bitter taste. Why use a bitter plant to help with digestion? Well, bitters are good for you. They stimulate the secretion of digestive juices in the stomach and support the breakdown of fats, supporting a healthy appetite and assisting in the assimilation of nutrients. The main bitter substance in Blessed Thistle is cnicin.

Blessed Thistle can be made into a tea, although other aromatic herbs should be added to reduce the bitter flavor. Blessed thistle tea has been used historically by midwives and naturopaths to support healthy breast milk production. That’s because Blessed thistle is a galactagogue that is used to promote lactation. A galactagogue is any natural or synthetic substance that increases milk production. 

Herbal galactagogues have been used for thousands of years. The most commonly used galactagogue herbs are fenugreek, hops, blessed thistle, and red raspberry leaves. Blessed thistle is said to increase milk supply two to three days after consumption. 

 

Blessed thistle is often used as a treatment for:

  • Anorexia
  • Arthritis
  • Fevers
  • Respiratory allergies
  • Poor appetite
  • Indigestion
  • Bronchitis
  • Flatulence 
  • Excess mucus
  • Gastrointestinal problems
  • Poor liver function 

Interesting fact: In Shakespeare's comedy, Much Ado About Nothing, Blessed thistle, in tincture form, is recommended for a cold.

If you'd like to check out some of our products that contain Saw Palmetto, please visit these links:


 ADR Complex by Professional Botanicals

 Liver Detox by Professional Botanicals

 Liver Detox + Silymarin by Professional Botanicals



Note: The content of this article, and additional content on this website, are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking help because of something you read here on this website.





Dandelion - More Than a Pesky Weed!

Dandelions are often thought of as weeds. They grow everywhere and their little puffballs go flying in the wind with just a breath of air. Did you know that they’ve been around forever; probably about 30 million years. However, they’ve only been in North America for a couple of centuries – having made their grand entrance on the Mayflower, it’s believed, brought here for their medicinal purposes.

Naturally Botanicals-Dandelion-Taraxacum officinale fieldDandelion is translated from dent de lion (tooth of the lion) because its leaves look like a lion’s tooth. The genus name, Taraxacum, is derived from the Greek taraxos, meaning “disorder,” and akos, meaning “remedy.” And it’s no wonder why it’s been called that. Dandelion greens are known as Taraxacum officinale.

Part of the flowering plants in the family Asteraceae, including Jerusalem Artichoke, the plant is also known as blowball, cankerwort, milk witch, lion's-tooth, yellow-gowan, Irish daisy, and puff-ball. 

Dandelions have been used by humans for food and as an herb for much of recorded history. They were well-known to ancient civilizations and have been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat hepatitis, bronchitis, mastitis, and to enhance immune response to upper respiratory infections, for over a thousand years. Dandelion was first noted for its medicinal qualities in the works of Arabian physicians of the tenth and eleventh centuries as being used to treat liver and spleen disorders. Native Americans used the dandelion root in preparations to treat kidney disease and heartburn.

Naturally Botanicals-Dandelion-Taraxacum officinale

The entire plant, including the leaves, stems, flowers and roots, is edible and has a high nutritional value. The root was traditionally roasted and consumed as a beverage, while the leaves and flowers were used in salads and other raw vegetable dishes. Dandelions are low in calories and high in fiber. It contains abundant vitamins and minerals, especially vitamins A, C, D, K, and B-complex.  Dandelions are also a good source of manganese, magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, phosphorus, sodium, beta-carotene, and potassium. They are especially high in antioxidants. The roots are rich in inulin, a prebiotic that helps encourage the growth of healthy microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract.

 

Dandelion is thought to help provide the following health benefits:

  • improving appetite
  • reducing joint pain and muscle aches
  • helping relieve digestive ailments, upset stomach and intestinal gas
  • stimulating the functions of the stomach, liver and bile
  • treating infection 
  • treating skin conditions
  • as a laxative 
  • and as a diuretic

Dandelion contains more vitamins and minerals than most vegetables. It’s eaten raw in salads, cooked or boiled, the flowers can be batter-fried, and the dried roots are used as a coffee substitute. Dandelion coffee not your thing? Try dandelion tea made with the dried herb or root. Or go for the dandelion beer or wine!

Sauteed Spicy Dandelion Greens and Onions features onions, cloves, a hot Italian cherry pepper and ground black pepper. Spice up those greens!

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/sauteed-spicy-dandelion-greens-and-onions-51233220

If you'd like to check out some of our products that contain Dandelion root, please visit these links:

Lax-Ease by Professional Botanicals

LipoZymes by Professional Botanicals

Liver Detox by Professional Botanicals

Liver Detox + Silymarin by Professional Botanicals

Lymph Detox by Professional Botanicals

pH Balance by Professional Botanicals

Serrapeptase + Prozyme by Professional Botanicals

Water Balance by Professional Botanicals

 


Note: The content of this article, and additional content on this website, are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking help because of something you read here on this website.